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The misinformation age

O'Reilly Radar - Fri, 2018/11/02 - 13:00

Jane Adams examines the ways data-driven recruiting fails to achieve intended results and perpetuates discriminatory hiring practices.

Continue reading The misinformation age.

Categories: Technology

Learning from the web of life

O'Reilly Radar - Fri, 2018/11/02 - 13:00

Claire Janisch looks at some of the best biomimicry opportunities inspired by nature’s software and wetware.

Continue reading Learning from the web of life.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 2 November 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Fri, 2018/11/02 - 05:25

Colorizing Photos, Evolving Space Invaders, Is It Too Late?, and Decision-Making

  1. DeOldify -- Deep learning-based project for colorizing and restoring old images. Impressive, and open source.
  2. InvaderZ -- Space invaders, but the invaders evolve with a genetic algorithm.
  3. The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Create It. But Is It Already Too Late? -- Alan Kay lecture. If we've done things with technology that got us in a bit of a pickle, doing things with technology will probably only make that worse. When Alan Kay speaks, I listen.
  4. Farsighted -- new book by Steven Johnson, on powerful tools for honing the important skill of complex decision-making. Shades of Algorithms to Live By, but Johnson is a good writer and a good thinker, so this promises to be much more.

Continue reading Four short links: 2 November 2018.

Categories: Technology

Kubernetes: Good or evil? The ethics of data centers

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 10:00

Anne Currie says excessive and dirty energy use in data centers is one of the biggest ethical issues facing the tech industry.

Continue reading Kubernetes: Good or evil? The ethics of data centers.

Categories: Technology

Highlights from the O'Reilly Velocity Conference in London 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 10:00

Watch highlights from expert talks covering Kubernetes, chaos engineering, deep learning, and more.

People from across the distributed systems world came together in London for the O'Reilly Velocity Conference. Below you'll find links to highlights from the event.

Kubernetes: Good or evil? The ethics of data centers

Anne Currie says excessive and dirty energy use in data centers is one of the biggest ethical issues facing the tech industry.

Incognito mentorship

Katrina Owen says the valuable skills that experienced professionals lack are at the vital margins of their careers.

Deriving meaning in a time of chaos: The intersection between chaos engineering and observability

Crystal Hirschorn discusses how organizations can benefit from combining established tech practices with incident planning, post-mortem-driven development, chaos engineering, and observability.

A new vision for the global brain: Deep learning with people instead of machines

Omoju Miller outlines a vision where we harness human action for a better future.

Learning from the web of life

Claire Janisch looks at some of the best biomimicry opportunities inspired by nature’s software and wetware.

The misinformation age

Jane Adams examines the ways data-driven recruiting fails to achieve intended results and perpetuates discriminatory hiring practices.

The freedom of Kubernetes

Kris Nova looks at the new era of the cloud native space and the kernel that has made it all possible: Kubernetes.

What changes when we go offline first?

Martin Kleppmann shows how recent computer science research is helping develop the abstractions and APIs for the next generation of applications.

Continue reading Highlights from the O'Reilly Velocity Conference in London 2018.

Categories: Technology

Deriving meaning in a time of chaos: The intersection between chaos engineering and observability

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 10:00

Crystal Hirschorn discusses how organizations can benefit from combining established tech practices with incident planning, post-mortem-driven development, chaos engineering, and observability.

Continue reading Deriving meaning in a time of chaos: The intersection between chaos engineering and observability.

Categories: Technology

Incognito mentorship

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 10:00

Katrina Owen says the valuable skills that experienced professionals lack are at the vital margins of their careers.

Continue reading Incognito mentorship.

Categories: Technology

A new vision for the global brain: Deep learning with people instead of machines

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 10:00

Omoju Miller outlines a vision where we harness human action for a better future.

Continue reading A new vision for the global brain: Deep learning with people instead of machines.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 1 November 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Thu, 2018/11/01 - 03:15

Data Science, AI Ethics, Coded for Curiosity, and Worm Parking

  1. How to Decide Which Data Science Projects to Pursue (Hilary Mason) -- data science projects are not independent from one another. With each completed project, successful or not, you create a foundation to build later projects more easily and at lower cost. Some good advice on how to build a non-sucky data strategy.
  2. AI Ethics, Impossibility Theorems, and Tradeoffs -- There is no policy choice that satisfies all ethical principles. A data scientist takes us through the options and the math that makes this statement true.
  3. Reinforcement Learning with Prediction-Based Rewards (Open AI) -- We’ve developed random network distillation (RND), a prediction-based method for encouraging reinforcement learning agents to explore their environments through curiosity, which for the first time exceeds average human performance on Montezuma’s Revenge. RND achieves state-of-the-art performance, periodically finds all 24 rooms, and solves the first level without using demonstrations or having access to the underlying state of the game.
  4. C. Elegans Can Park a Car -- it only took 12 neurons, and yet you look down any city street and...*sigh*.

Continue reading Four short links: 1 November 2018.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 31 October 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Wed, 2018/10/31 - 04:10

Who Gets What, Kindle Notes, Advertising in Young Children's Apps, and Hidden Data

  1. Rethinking Who Gets What and Why -- Tim O'Reilly's latest talk. Read the presenter notes for the meat.
  2. Klipbook -- convert highlights and notes on your Kindle to nice HTML, Markdown, or JSON.
  3. Advertising in Young Children's Apps: A Content Analysis -- Of the 135 apps reviewed, 129 (95%) contained at least one type of advertising. These included use of commercial characters (42%); full-app teasers (46%); advertising videos interrupting play (e.g., pop-ups [35%] or to unlock play items [16%]); in-app purchases (30%); prompts to rate the app (28%) or share on social media (14%); distracting ads such as banners across the screen (17%) or hidden ads with misleading symbols such as “$” or camouflaged as gameplay items (7%). Advertising was significantly more prevalent in free apps (100% vs 88% of paid apps), but occurred at similar rates in apps labeled as “educational” versus other categories. Many things happening online that were prohibited for children's TV in the 1970s. (via BoingBoing)
  4. JPG with a ZIP (Twitter) -- the image in this tweet is also a valid ZIP archive, containing a multipart RAR archive, containing the complete works of Shakespeare.

Continue reading Four short links: 31 October 2018.

Categories: Technology

Why software architects fail and what to do about it

O'Reilly Radar - Tue, 2018/10/30 - 08:00

Stefan Tilkov looks at common software architecture pitfalls and explains how they can be avoided.

Continue reading Why software architects fail and what to do about it.

Categories: Technology

Introducing serverless to your organization

O'Reilly Radar - Tue, 2018/10/30 - 08:00

Mike Roberts explores ideas for trying serverless as well as a framework for evaluating its effectiveness within your organization.

Continue reading Introducing serverless to your organization.

Categories: Technology

Career advice for architects

O'Reilly Radar - Tue, 2018/10/30 - 08:00

Trisha Gee shares advice and lessons she learned the hard way while managing her career as a developer, lead, and technical advocate.

Continue reading Career advice for architects.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 30 October 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Tue, 2018/10/30 - 04:40

AI Animations, Dataflow Apps, Decensoring with AI, and FPGA Programming

  1. A Mixed-Initiative Interface for Animating Static Pictures -- this looks awesome!
  2. Noria: Dynamic, Partially-Stateful Dataflow for High-Performance Web Applications -- Noria makes intelligent use of dataflow beneath the SQL interface (i.e., dataflow is not exposed as an end-user programming model) in order to maintain a set of (semi-)materialized views. Noria itself figures out the most efficient dataflows to maintain those views, and how to update the dataflow graphs in the face of schema / query set changes.
  3. DeCensoring Hentai with Deep Learning -- I already don't like where AI has taken us, and we're nowhere near SkyNet yet.
  4. Spatial -- a high-level programming language for FPGAs.

Continue reading Four short links: 30 October 2018.

Categories: Technology

Potholes in the road from monolithic hell: Microservices adoption anti-patterns

O'Reilly Radar - Mon, 2018/10/29 - 11:00

Chris Richardson describes microservices anti-patterns he’s observed while working with clients around the world.

Continue reading Potholes in the road from monolithic hell: Microservices adoption anti-patterns.

Categories: Technology

The challenges of migrating 150+ microservices to Kubernetes

O'Reilly Radar - Mon, 2018/10/29 - 11:00

Sarah Wells explains how the Financial Times migrated microservices between container stacks without affecting production users.

Continue reading The challenges of migrating 150+ microservices to Kubernetes.

Categories: Technology

Are microservices a security threat?

O'Reilly Radar - Mon, 2018/10/29 - 11:00

Liz Rice outlines the security implications of microservices, containers, and serverless.

Continue reading Are microservices a security threat?.

Categories: Technology

Highlights from the O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference in London 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Mon, 2018/10/29 - 11:00

Watch highlights from expert talks covering microservices, Kubernetes, serverless, and more.

People from across the software architecture world came together in London for the O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference. Below you'll find links to highlights from the event.

The challenges of migrating 150+ microservices to Kubernetes

Sarah Wells explains how the Financial Times migrated microservices between container stacks without affecting production users.

Are microservices a security threat?

Liz Rice outlines the security implications of microservices, containers, and serverless.

Potholes in the road from monolithic hell: Microservices adoption anti-patterns

Chris Richardson describes microservices anti-patterns he’s observed while working with clients around the world.

Why software architects fail and what to do about it

Stefan Tilkov looks at common software architecture pitfalls and explains how they can be avoided.

Introducing serverless to your organization

Mike Roberts explores ideas for trying serverless as well as a framework for evaluating its effectiveness within your organization.

Career advice for architects

Trisha Gee shares advice and lessons she learned the hard way while managing her career as a developer, lead, and technical advocate.

Continue reading Highlights from the O'Reilly Software Architecture Conference in London 2018.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 29 October 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Mon, 2018/10/29 - 04:00

Quantum Internet, Live Coding, Ethics Checklists, and Robot Compendium

  1. Quantum Internet: A Vision for the Road Ahead (Science) -- interesting paper laying out a roadmap for development of "the quantum internet." Stages: trusted repeater networks, prepare and measure networks, entanglement distribution networks, quantum memory networks, fault-tolerant few-qubit networks, and quantum computing networks. The full paper is behind a paywall (or sci-hub).
  2. Algojammer -- neat prototype of a Bret-Victor-like system to help you develop and understand algorithms. The execution of your code should be thought of as just a physical fact about the lines of text you have written. In the same way we might consider the "number of 'e' characters" in the code, or the "average line length" of the code, the "execution" of the code is just a static fact that is entirely determined by the code.
  3. Data Science Ethics Checklists -- This is not meant to be the only ethical checklist, but instead we try to capture reasonable defaults that are general enough to be widely useful. For your own projects with particular concerns, we recommend your own checklist.yml file that is maintained by your team and passed to this tool with the -l flag.
  4. IEEE Robots Guide -- a compendium of robots that are real and here today, most of which you can buy, from hands to scuttlers to humanoid robots with Einstein heads, to something that looks like a little yellow bird.

Continue reading Four short links: 29 October 2018.

Categories: Technology

Four short links: 26 October 2018

O'Reilly Radar - Fri, 2018/10/26 - 03:55

Legit DRM Hacking, CPU Emulation, Phish Yourself, and Data Structures

  1. Feds Say Hacking DRM to Fix Your Electronics Is Legal -- The Librarian of Congress and U.S. Copyright Office just proposed new rules that will give consumers and independent repair experts wide latitude to legally hack embedded software on their devices in order to repair or maintain them. This exemption to copyright law will apply to smartphones, tractors, cars, smart home appliances, and many other devices. (via BoingBoing)
  2. Unicorn Engine -- a lightweight multi-platform, multi-architecture CPU emulator framework.
  3. Gophish -- an open source phishing toolkit designed for businesses and penetration testers. It provides the ability to quickly and easily set up and execute phishing engagements and security awareness training.
  4. The Periodic Table of Data Structures -- We show that it is possible to argue about the design space of data structures. By discovering the first principles of the design of data structures and putting them in a universal model, we study their combinations and their impact on performance. We show that it is possible to accelerate research and decision-making concerning data structure design, hardware, and workload by being able to quickly compute the performance impact of a vast number of designs; several orders of magnitude more designs than what has been published during the last six decades.

Continue reading Four short links: 26 October 2018.

Categories: Technology

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